Joint Statement:

We the participants, Muslims, Christians and Jews, from different denominations, meet today in London, to express our solidarity with and support for our brothers and sisters of the Iraqi Christian community who have been subjected to terrorist attacks, in particular the congregation of ‘Our Lady of Salvation’ in Baghdad. We emphasise the shared cultural heritage of Muslims and Christians in Iraq, as well as other faiths and denominations, as they have lived together peacefully for generations not only in Iraq but also in other Arab countries and elsewhere. We stand shoulder to shoulder with Iraqi Christians to confront the terror and fear that this important part of Iraqi society now faces, emphasising that these terrorist attacks will not succeed in dividing us and destroying the great values that we share and out long history of peaceful coexistence.

Inter-religious Council consultation in the House of LordsConsultation on the Inter-Religious Council at the UN

Boothroyd Room

UK House of Commons

August 31st, 2010

The initiative of the Inter-Religious Council (IRC) at the United Nations, initiated by Rev. Dr. Sun Myung Moon as the founding purpose of the Universal Peace Federation (UPF), was yesterday emphasised by his son and successor, Rev. Dr. Hyung Jin Moon, the International Chairman of UPF, in the House of Commons’ Boothroyd room. The Harvard Divinity graduate, Rev. Moon, gave the keynote address commenting on the heritage of the Inter-Religious Council within the UK.


‘I am reminded that the first General Assembly of the United Nations was convened here in London, in 1946, at the Central Hall of the Methodist Church. I also note that the first meeting of the British parliament took place in Westminster Abbey. I believe England has always understood the necessary link between spiritual principles and values, on the one hand, and the public sphere of social, political and economic institutions, on the other hand.....In his message at the United Nations in the year 2000, Father Moon explained that the UN would not be able to fulfil its mission without creating a council that would uphold the spiritual wisdom and heritage of humanity, representing God’s guidance for all of us.’ (speech link here) Rev Marcus Braybrooke's speech link here. Imam Dr Sajid speech link here. Photos here.

Universal Peace Federation’s Founding Vision: The Inter-religious Council at the UN’ at 11-00 am 31st August 2010 at House of Commons Boothroyd Room Portcullis House London

Imam Dr Abduljalil Sajid

The Muslim Council for Religious and Racial Harmony UK

Bismillah Hir Rahma Nir Rahim (I begin with name of God the Most Kind the Most Merciful). I greet you with the greetings of Islam (Assalamu Alaykum wa Rahmatullah wa Barakathu (May God’s blessing and peace be with us all.) All perfect praise be to Allah, Subhaana wa ta’aala, The Lord of the worlds. I testify that there is none worthy of worship except Allah, and that Muhammad, is His servant and messenger Sallallaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam.

I am honoured -- and deeply humbled -- to be invited by the Universal Peace Federation to speak on an important topic on ‘UPF’s Founding Vision: The Inter-religious Council at the UN’. I salute the leadership of UPF specially Chairman Dr Thomas Welsh and UPF Secretary General Taj Hammad and International President of UPF, Rev Hyung Jin Moon who has taken UPF Founder’s vision to the grassroots all over the world and consulting “ We the people” as UN charter begins.

UPF strongly believes and works with different faiths. UPF work on Building Bridges between People of Faiths is exemplary.

Inter-Religious Council at the United Nations Consultation:

Comments from the audience about the inter-religious council were varied and informed.

1)      That we should have a Petition at each of the consultations and promote an Early Day Motion among MPs.

2)      How do we prevent religious leaders aggrandising against states or states imposing laws on religions?

3)      The religious process will inevitably become politicised.

I am grateful for the opportunity to say a few words and to add my welcome Rev and Mrs Hyung Jin Moon on their first visit to this country. I am also glad to express my personal support for the call for an Inter-Religious Council at the UN made ten years ago by Revd. Dr. Moon.

The need for a religious or spiritual presence at the UN has long been recognised by the World Congress of Faiths. Soon after the outbreak of the Second World War, Sir Francis Younghusband, the founder of the World Congress of Faiths, said, 'No reconstituted League of Nations will be of the slightest avail unless it is inspired  by an irresistible spiritual impulse.' In 1943, George Bell, Bishop of Chichester and  a leading member of WCF, said in the House that 'an association between the International authority and representatives of the living religions of the world' was of vital importance.


Efforts after the war to establish such a body were thwarted by the Soviet block. The situation now has changed and the UN General assembly has itself now recognised the importance of interfaith dialogue.

The need for an Interfaith Advisory Body at the UN remains.

There are several reasons for this.

1. The great religions agree that healthy societies – national or international – require a moral framework. And as the Global Ethic shows there is much agreement on what this should be. Laws are important – and it is right to hear to pay tribute to those who are law-makers – but society depends on trust and mutual care and concern. I remember Martin Luther King saying when he spoke in London that 'The law can stop   men lynching me, but it cannot make them love me.' Laws against stirring up religious hatred are important, but even more so is long term educational work to remove ignorance and prejudice.

2.  At a time when religion is abused by some to justify violence and religious differences are used to enflame economic and political disputes, politicians need the support of mainline religious leaders to persuade the faithful to repudiate extremism. The moral authority to religious leaders may also add weight to UN calls for a ceasefire, even if they were unable to stop the Iraq War.

3. Efforts after the war to establish such a body were thwarted by the Soviet block. The situation now has changed and the UN General assembly has itself now recognised the importance of interfaith dialogue.

The need for an Interfaith Advisory Body at the UN remains.

There are several reasons for this.

1. The great religions agree that healthy societies – national or international – require a moral framework. And as the Global Ethic shows there is much agreement on what this should be. Laws are important – and it is right to hear to pay tribute to those who are law-makers – but society depends on trust and mutual care and concern. I remember Martin Luther King saying when he spoke in London that 'The law can stop   men lynching me, but it cannot make them love me.' Laws against stirring up religious hatred are important, but even more so is long term educational work to remove ignorance and prejudice.

2.  At a time when religion is abused by some to justify violence and religious differences are used to enflame economic and political disputes, politicians need the support of mainline religious leaders to persuade the faithful to repudiate extremism. The moral authority to religious leaders may also add weight to UN calls for a ceasefire, even if they were unable to stop the Iraq War.

3. Much healthcare/relief work and education is delivered by faith-based organisations. The partnership between UN agencies and NGOs and civil society needs to be strengthened. Religions often reach down into local communities more effectively than many governmental otr international bodies.

What I think is now needed are detailed suggestions of how such an Interfaith Advisory Body to the UN might work . In the year 2000 there was a Millenium religious 'summit';  The World Economic Forum set up a senior council of 100 leaders, which included religious leaders. There are several interfaith NGOs.

But they are not integrated into the UN system and perhaps a working party should try to produce models for an Interfaith Advisory Body?

How do you identify religious leaders – by office or by charisma. Would you ask the Archbishop of Canterbury to represent the Anglican Communion or Archbishop Desmond Tutu?

How do you ensure the participation of women, young people and religious minorities?

How do you ensure that faith communities have the necessary expertise to translate lofty ideas into practical policies. It seems to me that besides an annual meeting of leaders, there would be need for each religion to have permanent representatives working together at the UN?

There will also be need to ensure that religious leaders do not try to usurp the role of heads of state and that nations do not use religion to give a cloak of respectability to questionable policies.Careful thought is needed about the scope and nature of an Interfaith Advisory Body – but the need for such a body is more urgent than ever.

Rev Dr Marcus Braybrooke President of the World Congress of Faith


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